Hot Tub Energy Saving Tips

Another cold Western New York winter is just around the corner, and it is important to maintain your spa so that you can save energy and money by keeping temperatures up. Years ago keeping a hot tub hot in the winter was a costly process, but now that is just a thing of the past. Spas being built today are more efficient than ever with  design, performance, and energy efficiency, and it is important that you do everything you can to save even more energy.

A major key to keeping spa operations costs low is heat retention. Deep Blue Pool and Spa sells spas that have great insulation which helps aid in energy efficiency. Coast Spas use a full-foam insulation system which is not only energy efficient, but also a heat saver. This 100% full-foam inside reduces heat loss and promotes strength in the tub.

Our Dynasty spas come with a Heastsheild Insulation System, which is engineered to minimize heat loss and maximize energy efficiency. Dynasty spas come with the option to get the R-Max insulation upgrade which not only further protects the spa and improves insulation – but also allows for easier service.

Our PDC spas provide some of the top insulation technology out there today. All PDC Spas are protected from cold, damp, and outside elements with a multi-layer bottom construction.  A tough ABS plastic material covers the entire bottom and tightly wraps up the cabinet sides.  A  layer of pressure-treated plywood is added for strength, while a  layer of thick foam is sandwiched between the ABS and plywood for superior insulation. An inside reflective thermal barrier ensures outstanding thermal efficiency.

 PDC Spas TemperLOK™ insulation system provides maximum energy savings while maintaining a lightweight unit for easier installations. The use of a strong   fiberglass, non-filled resin backing with an insulating foam coating provides maximum strength and efficiency.  Using this process, a PDC Spa is more costly to manufacture, however,each and every PDC spa unit is made with quality and efficiency in mind. With the PDC Spas TemperLOK™ design,   simply remove any of the side panels, easily view the backside of the spa shell,   complete maintenance and replace the panel. Quick, efficient, and economical. Your   spa remains strong and  insulated.

Covers are your spas last line of defense for heat retention. You must make sure that your cover is sealed properly with no cracks or gaps for heat to escape. All of our covers at Deep Blue Pool and Spa are designed to keep heat in, so be sure your cover is up-to-date and in good shape or you will be wasting heat and money. We also suggest that you purchase the proper products to keep the outside and top of your cover in the best shape possible.

Another good way to keep heat in your tub is a thermal blanket or a spa solar cover, which will keep evaporation under your cover to a minimum. This can also protect your cover. Deep Blue Pool and Spa also suggest you get s foil based bubble wrap which can be purchased at local hardware stores, to ensure that no heat escapes out the sides of your cover. This wrap is used to seal the outside of your cover securely so absolutely no air can escape or get in.

More ways to keep heat in your spa is to try if possible to strategically place your spa in a place that is not only in the sun for the duration of the day, but also blocked or protected from harsh winter winds by a fence or shed. Another great way to protect your spa from harsh winds is the Covana hot tub cover. These covers not only seal your spa tight, they also have different shades that can block wind from any direction. )We sell these in store, and for more information visit the Covana site at http://www.sterlingcovana.com/) Another good tip is to keep your spa away from edges of your house that cause water and ice drips, this can not only hard your cover, but promote heat loss.

For more  and spa maintenance tips visit call us at 585-343-POOL or visit us at our Batavia location! 4152 W Main Street Rd (Valu Plaza) Batavia, NY 14020

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